Walking the Met Line Part 2

After yesterday’s trek from Paddington to Euston Square, we did more of an amble between King’s Cross and Farringdon today to complete the original Metropolitan Line.

We didn’t have to wait very long for our first chance to see down to the Tube tracks once we left King’s Cross…

One of the openings to the Tube tracks in St. Chad Place

One of the openings to the Tube tracks in St. Chad Place

Tall folks having a look down at the tracks Tall folks having a look down at the tracks.

To have a look, I did the old ‘hold my camera/phone over my head and the wall and take a photo’ trick. Turned out alright…

Over the Wall Shot On the left are the disused King’s Cross Thameslink platforms, on the right the Met / Circle / Hammersmith & City tracks.

We got to go through some more quiet streets today. Yesterday’s walk was of course pretty much right down Marylebone and Euston Roads as that is how the Tube line runs.

Bed & Break As Bed & Break As Hotel in Wicklow Street.

We took a small detour from the Met Line into Ray Street.

Fleet River Grate, Ray Street

We all stood around that small grate in the street and didn’t say a word. From the there, you can hear the Fleet River as it’s directly above the sewer it now runs through.

Looking down to the Fleet River And if you go in for a closer look, you can see the Fleet.

Another opening to the track, Farrdingdon Road Another opening to the tracks in Farringdon Road.

Terminating at Farringdon Our Terminus, Farringdon Station. This station building being from 1923. It shows the station’s second name along the top; Farringdon & High Holborn. First it was called Farringdon Street and of course now, just Farringdon.

If you fancy taking a Tube walk, have a look at Mark’s website where he has a schedule up of his Piccadilly, District, and Central line walks.

Walking the Met Line Part 1

My buddy Mark Mason is doing a walk of the Metropolitan Line for the London Transport Museum as part of the Met’s / Tube’s 150th birthday.

Today’s walk was part 1 - Paddington to Euston Square. Or as they were named back in January 1863 when they opened, Bishops Road and Gower Street. I took a couple of snaps before it got a bit rainy.

Mark Mason giving us a walk intro
Mark gives us the intro at Paddington.

Opening for Tube train steam, Bouverie Place
Opening for Tube train steam, Bouverie Place, for back when it was all run by steam trains, there had to be openings to let the steam out.

Peeking down to the tracks in Bouverie Place
Peeking down to the tracks. Someone had to have the gumption to go first.

More people get brave
And then more joined in. I wasn’t feeling too sure of my footing so kept both feet on the ground.

Edgware Road Station
Edgware Road Station, building from 1928.

Former Woolworth's HQ, Marylebone Road
Former Woolworth’s HQ, Marylebone Road. The W decoration weighs over a tonne.

Tomorrow we will be doing the rest of the original line; from King’s Cross to Farringdon.

New London Bus, a set on Flickr.The number 24 bus route was converted to all new buses on Saturday June 22nd, 2013. I caught a ride and a couple of snaps.
New London BusView from the top deckNew bus approachesNew London Bus + Chelsea Pensioner on board

New London Bus, a set on Flickr.

The number 24 bus route was converted to all new buses on Saturday June 22nd, 2013. I caught a ride and a couple of snaps.
Former Hyde Park Corner tube station building, Hyde Park Corner 
This station building, designed by Leslie Green, opened in 1906. However, it was closed in the 1930s after escalators were installed. The building and it’s lifts were no longer needed.

Former Hyde Park Corner tube station building, Hyde Park Corner 

This station building, designed by Leslie Green, opened in 1906. However, it was closed in the 1930s after escalators were installed. The building and it’s lifts were no longer needed.

Lloyd’s of London on Flickr.
Lloyd’s of London - Richard Rogers - 1986: Radical at the time for having all of the building services on the outside to keep the inside completely open. The rounded bits on either side are the stair wells. The rectangular cabins with the port holes are the toilets. You can see all the ducts for the air conditioning, electrical and such running along the side. All together it looks a bit like an oil rig. The design was modular so that floors could be added and removed easily. Now that the building is listed though, it can’t be changed.

Lloyd’s of London on Flickr.

Lloyd’s of London - Richard Rogers - 1986: Radical at the time for having all of the building services on the outside to keep the inside completely open.

The rounded bits on either side are the stair wells. The rectangular cabins with the port holes are the toilets. You can see all the ducts for the air conditioning, electrical and such running along the side. All together it looks a bit like an oil rig.

The design was modular so that floors could be added and removed easily. Now that the building is listed though, it can’t be changed.

HMS Illustrious in Greenwich. Had I been there about 20 minutes earlier I would have seen a flypast here as well.

HMS Illustrious in Greenwich. Had I been there about 20 minutes earlier I would have seen a flypast here as well.